Pricing

May 24th, 2013 | By | Category: Jack Schrock's Blog

The topic has been discussed for years and there doesn’t seem to be a right way that appeals to everybody. On one extreme we have the tower who just pencils in a figure with no explanation or detail. On the other end there is the tower who tells a story with his/her invoice, including pictures, a running narrative and maybe even interviews with bystanders. And, at that level, just preparing the invoice can be a major undertaking that runs up the cost of services.

In a perfect world, it would be great if the tower and customer could agree on a price to begin with. For example, I remember a New York tower who was called on to retrieve a large commercial airliner from the grassy taxiway that had turned into a muddy bog. He talked with his insurance carrier and recovery crew and came up with a fixed price to which the customer agreed. So, preparing the invoice was easy.

But we don’t live in a perfect world and towers are regularly faced with recoveries that require special planning. This process can be compromised by the circumstances at the scene not the least of which is the guy with the badge and gun demanding immediate action. Also, I know of towers who hit the scene taking pictures while developing a recovery plan. Truth be known, the tower who takes the time to evaluate the situation and plan his work is also the guy who usually gets the job done in the least amount of time and often with only minimal additional damage.

Here’s the bottom line: Some towers are so focused on the recovery they do not keep track of important details. So when the customer questions the invoice, the tower has difficulty explaining his charges and even gets mad when questioned because he made a serious effort to get the job done quickly.

So, let’s go back to the old 750 days when there was no way to get ‘er done quickly. In fact, walking and talking was the order of the day and that alone brought us to a consensus long before the invoice was written.