Traveling

Feb 15th, 2013 | By | Category: Jack Schrock's Blog

Traveling is fairly easy when you know where you’re starting from and where you’re going. That’s simple enough. But if you’re not sure of your present circumstances and don’t really know what direction you want to follow in the future, well that’s another thing.

Most of us live in the present, which means our thoughts are focused on the needs and opportunities of today. It’s hard to try to visualize where we will be, or where we want to be, in a year or two or even ten for that matter. Now if I hit the lottery Saturday night, I have a bucket list but will I really pursue that or focus more on the “needs and opportunities of today?” Life is a series of changes, or adjustments, driven by a number of factors. “This isn’t your grandfather’s Oldsmobile” anymore than “this isn’t your grandfather’s Towing and Recovery Business” anymore.

I always enjoy talking with the Europeans because they seem to be in a leadership role in T & R along with a number of other industries. Want to see where we will be in five years? Take a look at England. Want to see where we were 50 years ago? Take a look at Slovenia. But not everything translates exactly because our conditions are different than theirs in many respects. Their cities and towns are literally centuries old, and the streets are narrow extensions of cart paths. Yet, driven by the auto clubs, I suppose, they seem to be far more customer oriented. Indeed, some towers here tend to look at the casualty as the customer instead of the real, live person who wants to be on his way in the shortest possible time. As a result, I’ve seen crew cab carriers in England where the back seat is a customer lounge, complete with TV, VCR, radio, fridge, newspapers, toys, curtains and a dividing forward glass that seals out inquiring eyes and the persistent noise. What would happen if a tower here upgraded one of his carriers with these features? Would it increase business? Could he charge more? Could it even expand into an underserved, yet-to-be-developed segment of T & R?

Be careful not to follow the guy in front because he may not know where he’s going.